Tag Archives: car buying

repo cars

What are the Steps to Buying Repossessed Cars?

When making the decision to buy a repossessed car, the best thing you can do is educate yourself on the process. Even though buying a repo car is similar to buying a used car, there are still some differences to be aware of. The more you know, the better position you’ll be in to make strong bids and take home the car you want.

Below are the steps to follow to make repo car shopping smooth and stress free!

Visit RepoFinder.com 

RepoFinder makes buying a used car easy. We are a directory of banks selling repossessions across the country. You can browse our listings for free and become a member and start bidding for just $4.95 a month! Our site is user-friendly and easy to navigate, making it easy to find valuable information on the cars you’re interested in. 

Narrow Down Your Search 

Make sure you do the proper research when browsing and closing in on a car. You can also filter vehicles by different categories to find something that’s just right for you! Repo car listings include the vehicle information, specifications and features. Most sellers do a good job of posting images, so be sure to examine the photos for the condition of the vehicle, possible damage and more. 

Bid on the Car You Want

Once you find the car you would like to purchase, you will need to bid on the vehicle. The most common is an open bid where all buyers are able to view the highest bid. Sometimes it’s a closed bid, meaning you won’t see what others have offered for the vehicle. Don’t get bid-happy though! Only offer what you feel comfortable and leave some budget for repairs and maintenance. 

Schedule an Inspection

You probably won’t be able to test drive the vehicle for liability reasons, but you should have it inspected. You can hire a mechanic to assess the vehicle or bring along someone who understands cars. If the vehicle is in another state, you’ll have to find an inspection company within that state. The mechanic will provide updates and their analysis of the car. Mechanics may not always find all the issues but their input is critical. 

Pay for the Car

After getting the analysis on the car you recently bid on, you’ll have to complete payment. Buying the car from a credit union is similar to buying from a car dealer or private party. The banks will assist you with the financing, and you’ll have to fill out paperwork and make a down payment. 

Buying a repossessed car is a process that most people may not be as familiar with, but it’s easier than you think! And you can get a great deal by shopping for bank-owned vehicles. Check out RepoFinder’s database today to start viewing the cars we have available! 

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Car Fees to Expect When Buying a Used Car

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Buying a new vehicle is an exciting experience, that is, until you see the number of fees you’re hit with! Some of these fees are conveniently rolled into your monthly payments, but you still want to be aware of what extra things you have to cover. You don’t want to get stuck paying for fees that aren’t really necessary. 

Below we’ll cover the most common fees you encounter when purchasing a new or used vehicle. Keep in mind that every state is different in how they charge sales tax on trade-ins and rebates. Plus, most states don’t have a cap on documentation fees, so they can range from $50-$400 or more depending on where you live.

What Fees Can I Expect When Purchasing a Car? 

Generally speaking, there are three categories of fees you will encounter when purchasing a used or repossessed vehicle:

  • Title and registration fees. When you buy a used car, you’ll need to transfer the title and register the vehicle in your name. Without a title in your name, there is no way to prove that you are the owner of the vehicle. 
  • Used car sales tax. You’ll probably have to pay a used car sales tax when purchasing a pre-owned vehicle. The amount you pay depends on the state you’re buying the car in. 
  • Documentation fee. Most states require you to pay a documentation fee before driving away with the vehicle. This fee covers things like processing paperwork, storing documents and writing up contracts. 

Aside from these fees, you may have to pay the following as well: 

  • Export and shipping fees. If you purchase a repossessed vehicle from a different state, consider how you’ll get the car. You may have to pay a third party to ship the repo to you.
  • Sales taxes. Depending on your state, you may have to pay sales taxes on the vehicle. Some factors can influence the taxes you pay, such as trading in another vehicle or qualifying for rebates and incentives. 
  • Repairs. Cars sold through auctions often need some repairs, so be sure to factor these into your cost. It’s best to stick with cars and trucks that only require light repair work like tire and break changes. 

Shop for Your New Car with RepoFinder

Are you thinking about buying a repossessed car from an online site like RepoFinder.com? Many people have had great experiences with their purchases through us. We have a full list of banks, credit unions and lenders that are selling cars, trucks and recreational vehicles. Most are in great condition and ready for a new owner! Browse our site today and find your dream vehicle.