Category Archives: Used Cars

paying for car in cash

Budgeting for a Car: 5 Tips for Paying in Cash

Cars are expensive, which means you shouldn’t make spur-of-the-moment decisions! In fact, by taking your time to look for vehicles and putting away money each month, you might be able to pay cash for your vehicle! This will eliminate your car payment and give you more breathing room in your monthly budget. 

While saving enough money to pay for a car in cash isn’t easy, it is possible with proper planning. Here are five tips to help you pay for a used or repossessed vehicle with hard-earned cash

1. Determine Your Budget 

First, determine how much you can afford to spend on a car. The rule of thumb is that you shouldn’t spend any more than 20% of your income on a vehicle. So if you make $100,000, your car should only cost $20,000. Most people pay way more than this! Plus, you need to make room for surprise repairs. 

2. Start Saving Early 

Start saving as early as you can. Even small amounts of money add up over time. Think of it this way: To save almost $1,100 a year, you only need to put away $3 a day. By making coffee at home or bringing a sack lunch to work, you can save thousands of dollars in just a year or two! 

3. Avoid Temptation 

Don’t walk into a dealership or start shopping for repos online until you have something saved up. Maybe it’s not enough to purchase the car in its entirety, but it will at least be enough for a down payment and title and registration fees. The more temptation that’s in front of you, the harder it is to stick to your goals. 

4. Narrow Down Your Search 

Keep your search as narrow as you can. Do this by identifying your needs and researching the cars that will work. Otherwise, it’s easy to be swayed by the latest features like heated seats and remote start. While these features are nice, you don’t want to be paying for them for the next 5 to 6 years! 

5. Know How to Negotiate 

If you plan to buy a used or repossessed car, strengthen your negotiation skills. Don’t be afraid to stand your ground and know what you’re willing to compromise on. Of course, being a good negotiator is not the same as being stubborn. It requires you to know what you’re buying and what you can save on. 

These five tips will help you pay for your repo vehicle in cash. Paying in cash offers a number of benefits, including stronger negotiations and not having to pay interest. To browse a wide selection of repossessed cars in great condition, visit RepoFinder and click on your state! 

performing a car inspection

What Type of Inspection Should I Do on a Used Car?

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Thinking about buying a used or repossessed vehicle? A careful evaluation will help you avoid hidden problems. This is especially important if you plan to buy a repo car, as these vehicles are sold as-is. In exchange for buying the car in its current condition, you’ll get a nice discount from the seller. 

RepoFinder offers a huge directory of repossessed cars, trucks, SUVs and recreational vehicles at low prices. There is no middleman – the vehicles listed on our site are sold straight from the banks and credit unions. They’re highly motivated sellers who are often willing to negotiate.

As long as you do your research and perform an inspection before signing the paperwork, you should have no trouble finding a decent car at a great price. Below is the type of inspection you should do before buying a repo car. 

Exterior 

Check each panel carefully, along with the roof. It’s not uncommon for used vehicles to have some dents and scratches, but do pay attention to rust. Rust is a cause for concern because it eats away at the metal. The places to look for rust include the wheel wells, the panels beneath the doors and the door bottoms.

Open and close each door, including the hood and trunk. If anything seems loose, the car has likely had long use. Also look for shoddy repair work such as discolored paint, misaligned panels, large gaps or patched dents. 

Glass 

Look carefully at the glass to make sure there are no cracks. A small chip isn’t a cause for concern, though we still suggest bringing it up in negotiations. You’ll eventually have to replace the glass to prevent it from cracking further. 

Suspension

Walk around the car to see if it’s sitting level. Push down on each corner. As long as the shock absorbers are in good condition, the car should rebound just once. Grab the top of each front tire and give it a tug. If you hear a clunking sound, it’s likely that the wheel bearings and suspension joints need replacing. 

Lights and Lenses 

Make sure all lights and reflectors are working properly. They should be in good condition with no fogging, cracking or moisture. 

Tires 

Even though you can replace tires easily, they can still tell you a lot about a car. A car with less than 20,000 miles should have its original tires. Cars that have low mileage and new tires are a red flag. The tires should also be the same brand with even treadwear across all four. 

Interior 

Now for the fun part – the interior of the car! Remove the floor mats and check for signs of water. Upholstery shouldn’t be ripped or worn, especially in a newer car. The pedals should be in good condition, and all of the instruments and controls should work accordingly. If you’re able to turn on the engine, make sure the AC and heat work. 

By performing a detailed inspection, you can catch hidden problems with your vehicle. When you shop for a car with RepoFinder, you’ll have access to tons of cars in good condition! Communicate with the seller to schedule an inspection. And, if you’re not comfortable doing the inspection on your own, bring along a mechanic or knowledgeable friend.

retail vs whole prices on ford truck

Retail Price vs Wholesale Price: How Much is a Used Car Really Worth?

Whether you’re buying a car online, from a dealership or from a private party, it’s important to know what the car is worth. A car’s value depends on a number of factors like its age, mileage, condition, trim level and the location where it’s being sold. For every vehicle, there are two prices: retail and wholesale.

To get the best deal on a used car, it’s important to know the difference between these two numbers. Later in this post, we’ll also cover what “asking price” means so that you can be an effective negotiator.

Retail Price

The retail price is always higher than the wholesale price and what you would expect to pay for the car if it was being sold at a dealership. If you are buying the car from a private seller, you’ll probably pay a bit less. Retail prices are also higher because the dealerships are banking on you getting less from the trade-in, giving them a profit margin.

Wholesale Price 

Wholesale pricing is essentially a car’s trade-in value at the dealership. The dealer will then turn around and sell it to someone else for a profit. Understandably, trade-in prices are a lot lower than retail prices. You’re not likely to find a car being sold at a wholesale price, unless you shop for a repossessed vehicle through RepoFinder. 

In the wholesale end of business, there are different figures to be aware of. Every step of the way, there’s a middleman that takes their cut, which ends up giving the car a new value.

  • Trade-in. This is what the dealer is offering the customer. What they get for trading in their car can be used toward their next vehicle purchase.
  • Dealer-to-dealer. This pricing happens when one dealer sells the car to another. 
  • Auction. If the car goes to auction, which many do, it will have an auction price. Dealers and brokers often buy cars at auction for resale. 

Asking Price 

When shopping for used cars, you’ll definitely come across the term “asking price.” This is different from retail and wholesale prices – and it’s negotiable. The asking price refers to the amount the seller is asking for the vehicle. But, dealers and private sellers know the customer will probably come back with another offer, which is why this price is not set in stone. 

Shop for Cars at Wholesale Prices 

Now that you are aware of this car shopping lingo, you can be a more effective shopper. RepoFinder is a directory of banks, credit unions and public auctions that sell repossessed cars directly to the public. There are no middlemen, allowing you to work out a deal between you and the seller. To start shopping for an affordable vehicle that rivals wholesale prices, shop with RepoFinder today. 

car with over 100k miles

Should I Buy a Car with Over 100,000 Miles?

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Buying a high-mileage car might seem like a risky purchase to some, but if you’re on a strict budget, it’s worth considering. In general, buying a car with a lot of miles is not a bad idea. Cars are a lot more reliable these days, so a car with over 100,000 miles is likely capable of traveling another 100,000 miles! 

With that said, cars do start to experience more problems once they reach the 100k mile mark. The car is technically past its prime, so you’ll need to be prepared to put some work into it. The good news is that the cost of the vehicle should offset repairs and maintenance.

Let’s learn more about the benefits of purchasing a car with over 100,000 miles and why you may very well come out on top! 

Lower Purchase Price

If you don’t have a lot to spend on a vehicle, you’ll have to compromise on a few things. Fortunately, when you do make these decisions, you’ll decrease the purchase price significantly. According to Kelley Blue Book, the average price for a new vehicle is $40,472

With these prices, you’re almost forced to go into debt just to afford a new car. That’s why a car with 100,000 miles can be so appealing. You can still get a great car with all the latest features and technologies at a fair price. In fact, you might even be able to save up and pay cash for a vehicle. Without a car payment, you can save on interest and instead put this money into repairs. 

Minimal Depreciation 

If you do purchase a new car, did you know that it will depreciate by 20 to 30 percent in the first year?! This means that if you purchase a vehicle for $40,000, it might only be worth $28,000 a year later. A car with over 100,000 miles will not depreciate this much – maybe $1,000 or so depending on how much you paid for it. This sounds like a much better deal, doesn’t it? 

Cheaper Insurance 

Auto insurance isn’t getting any cheaper, either. And the more expensive the car, the more expensive the insurance. A newer car is worth more money so insurance companies are going to charge a premium that reflects this risk. They have to protect themselves, too. 

When you buy a high-mileage vehicle, your insurance will be a lot lower because your car isn’t worth as much. And, if you pay in cash, you don’t need to carry full coverage. 

Lower Registration Fees 

Registration fees are lower with a high-mileage car. States do vary on this, however, so you’ll need to check with your state to find out how much you can save by choosing an economic vehicle. Add these savings to a lower purchase price, cheaper insurance and minimal depreciation and now you’re really starting to see the difference! 

Don’t be afraid to purchase a car with 100,000 miles or more on it. Cars have become a lot more reliable these days, so you can still get many years from this vehicle while saving significant money. To find an affordable vehicle that meets your needs, shop with Repofinder today

test driving a vehicle

Can I Test Drive a Repossessed Car?

A common question repo sellers often hear from customers is whether or not they can test drive the vehicle. It’s a great question to ask, especially when people are used to going to the dealerships and driving around the vehicles they want before buying them.

However, shopping for repossessed cars is a bit different. If you’re planning on buying a repossessed car, here’s everything you need to know about taking the vehicle for a spin. 

Sorry, But Test Drives Usually Aren’t Allowed 

Unfortunately, most sellers won’t allow you to test drive a repo vehicle. All you can do is sit in the car, turn it on and possibly put it into gear. Why is this the case? Are they trying to hide something? 

Actually, no. The main reason why auctions won’t let you drive the vehicle is because it’s a liability. When test driving a car from a dealership, it’s typically the dealer’s responsibility to cover any damages that may occur. Most dealers have a fleet policy that covers all of their vehicles. 

On the other hand, banks, lenders and credit unions don’t have fleet insurance. Remember, they loan money – they don’t sell cars! Not only that, but they don’t know what type of condition the car is really in. That’s why they’re selling it as-is. When you sign the paperwork, you are waiving these rights. But until then, driving it under the seller is a liability. 

You Can (and Should) Inspect the Repo Car 

Even though you can’t test drive the used vehicle, you can have it inspected. You can identify a lot of problems this way. Many sellers also allow bidders to start the car and put it into gear, but not all do, so be sure to ask these questions beforehand. 

We recommend bringing along someone who knows cars if you don’t. This can be a knowledgable friend or professional mechanic. They’ll know what to look for and can prevent you from getting too excited over a car that’s not the right fit. You certainly don’t want to overpay for a car with problems. Beware of sellers who won’t let you come and see the vehicle. 

Find Reputable Repo Sellers at RepoFinder 

RepoFinder has a huge selection of cars, trucks, SUVs and recreational vehicles that are waiting for their new owners. Our sellers are reputable and include trusted banks, lenders and credit unions. When you find a few vehicles that you like, schedule an inspection to see them in person! 

red repo truck

What are the Cheapest Cars to Insure?

When buying a new car, it’s a good idea to consider how much your insurance rates will be. To help you out, there are several studies that provide this research so that consumers know which cars will be most affordable. Fortunately, knowing this information can help you save hundreds of dollars a year on car insurance! 

What Determines the Price of an Auto Insurance Policy? 

First, it’s helpful to know how car insurance is calculated, as it’s not all about the car you drive. Each company has their own formula, which is why rates vary among car insurance companies. However, most companies use the following factors to determine the price of their auto policies: 

  • Your driving record
  • Your credit history  
  • How often you use your car 
  • Where you park your car 
  • Your age and gender
  • The type of car you drive

What Cars Have the Cheapest Insurance Rates? 

Even though there are many factors that influence what you pay for insurance, the type of car you buy can make a big difference on your rates. If you’re trying to keep your monthly expenses down, you’ll want to be aware of the most and least expensive cars to insure. And as always, compare rates with multiple carriers. 

Generally speaking, minivans and small trucks are the cheapest to insure compared to other vehicles. On the other hand, large sedans, sports vehicles and luxury cars have some of the most expensive insurance rates. New cars are also more expensive to insure because they’re worth more. 

Specifically, here is a breakdown of the ten least expensive vehicles to insure

  1. Honda CR-V – Small SUV
  2. Chrysler Pacifica – Minivan
  3. Honda Odyssey – Minivan
  4. Ford F-Series – Standard pickup truck
  5. Toyota RAV4 – Small SUV
  6. Chevrolet Equinox – Small SUV
  7. Chevrolet Colorado – Small pickup truck
  8. Toyota Tundra – Standard pickup truck
  9. Honda Ridgeline – Small pickup truck 
  10. Ford Fiesta – Subcompact car

Other Ways to Save on Your Auto Insurance 

Aside from the type of car you buy, there are some other ways to save on car insurance. Bundling your auto insurance with a life or home policy is one of the best ways to get a discount. Also ask the insurance carrier about discounts they offer for safe driving, having no claims, being a good student and having safety features in the vehicle. 

For a great price on vehicles, shop with RepoFinder.com. We have a huge database of cars, small and standard pickup trucks, SUVs and more that are owned by banks or lenders. They don’t want these cars and are motivated to sell them to a new owner! You can get a great deal this way, and if you shop smart, you can save on car insurance, too! 

classic car

Save on Classic Cars with RepoFinder

If you relish classic cars, you certainly aren’t alone. People enjoy purchasing these vehicles because they either want something vintage to drive around for fun, or they want something to renovate and restore. Whatever your reasons are for buying a classic car, this is a relaxing hobby that offers plenty of rewards. The problem is that it’s also an expensive hobby! 

Luckily, there are some ways to make your hobby more affordable. Below are some tips on how to save time and money when buying a classic vehicle. 

Determine Your Reasons for Buying Vintage 

Are you buying a vintage car as an investment that will stay in your garage and increase in value? Or perhaps you’re buying one because it reminds you of your youth. You might even be investing in a classic car to restore, repair and maintain it yourself – a hobby that will keep you busy for years to come. 

When you determine why you want to purchase a classic car, you’ll have an easier time finding what you need. For example, if you’re looking for something fun and enjoyable rather than an emotional investment, you can look at auctions. Or, if you’re interested in restoring a vehicle, you can access a wide range of cars through a repo seller. 

Repossessed Auctions are a Great Place to Buy

As you browse classic cars on a site like RepoFinder.com, you can explore vehicles that you can’t find elsewhere. All types of vehicles – special cars, cars with unique histories, top-tier collector cars – are more commonly sold at auctions rather than in person. 

RepoFinder offers a huge inventory of vehicles that you can browse at one time. This is more desirable than going from website to website, and you’ll have a wide range of cars that you can consider all at once. Not to mention, some people really enjoy the thrill of bidding on classic cars and seeing if they win. 

Tips for Finding a Classic Car at an Auction 

When purchasing a classic car from an auction or repo site, here are some tips you’ll want to keep in mind:

  • Do your homework. Know what classic cars cost and how to account for maintenance and upkeep costs. You don’t want to overbid, pay more than you need to and then have to make costly repairs. 
  • Consider a membership. Most auctions require you to pay a fee, but you can significantly reduce these costs when you use a repo site like RepoFinder.com. For just $4.95 a month and no contract, you can access all vehicles on our site. 
  • Perform an inspection. Always read the description of the vehicle and carefully view the photos. Most sellers will allow you to do an inspection as well. Take advantage of this and bring along someone who knows vintage cars. 

Shop for Classic Cars Today 

RepoFinder gets classic and vintage cars from time to time. Relax, browse our site at your leisure and try our membership for one month. You’ll have access to all of our repos for just $4.95/month – and you can cancel at any time!

white SUV

4 Basic Used Car Buying Mistakes to Avoid

Buying a new or used car is an exciting experience. You get to pick out something new and shiny while taking advantage of some of the latest features like automatic-braking sensors, mapping technology, adaptive cruise control and cameras in the back and front. But with so much to pay attention to, it’s easy to skip over important details that can come back to bite you later on. 

To help out, we’ve compiled a list of five used car mistakes you’ll want to avoid. 

Mistake #1. Not Doing the Proper Research. 

Even with all of the information available online, people still make this mistake quite often. It’s common for people to head to the dealership to see what’s available and buy something on the spot. They generally don’t return home, research cars and then go back to the dealership. Plus, there’s pressure from the car salespeople to buy something. 

Prepare yourself for the costs of buying a used car and know what features are important to you. And, if you do better in low-pressure environments, consider shopping online for used cars instead. This way, you can take your time, research your options, ask questions and read reviews. 

Mistake #2. Limiting Your Options. 

When you’re looking for a budget-friendly car that will get you to work, school or errands, it’s best to keep your options open. You might have a dream car in mind, but limiting your options based on a specific model, manufacturer or style can cause you to look over other great options. At the end of the day, you need a car that’s dependable and meets your lifestyle needs. 

Mistake #3. Overlooking a History Report.

We always recommend getting as much information as you can on the vehicle’s history. This isn’t always easy with repossessed cars and SUVs because these vehicles were taken from their previous owner and not much may be known about the history. But you can still usually find out some information such as the car’s miles, title status and accident history. All you need is the vehicle’s VIN. 

Mistake #4. Going Over Your Budget.

Whether it’s your dream car or the promise of new technology, it’s easy to overextend yourself on your budget. But let us tell you that after working with repossessions for many years, you don’t want to do this. Cars are meant to be functional and get you to where you need to go. You should not have to choose between groceries and a car payment every month. Choose your budget wisely and stick to it. You’ll thank yourself later. 

Plenty of people have made these mistakes when shopping for used cars, but you don’t have to. You can learn from them and choose a vehicle that makes sense for your budget and lifestyle – and be proud of it, too! To find an affordable used car, shop for repossessions at RepoFinder.com

man in new car

Top Useless Features You Don’t Need in a Car (and Certainly Shouldn’t Pay More For!)

When shopping for new and used cars online, it’s easy to get carried away with the cool features that are available in today’s models. However, some of these features are completely useless and not worth paying for. To ensure you keep your eyes focused on the best vehicles for your needs and budget, here are some meaningless features you don’t need to pay extra for. 

Rear Seat Entertainment Systems 

If you have kids, rear seat entertainment systems can sound like a blessing. And in the 1990s and early 2000s, they were. However, with the advent of tablets, smartphones and WiFi hotspots, these systems are almost irrelevant. If the car you’re looking at comes with this system, that’s great. Maybe you’ll use it, maybe you won’t. But it’s not worth paying extra for. 

Social Media Integration 

Our society has grown accustomed to communicating through social media apps like Facebook and Instagram. To tap into this interest, car companies have rolled out social media integration. At first glance, this would appear to be useful and worth paying extra for, but it’s not. Using social media, even through voice activation, falls under distracted driving. Leave social media for off the road. 

Spare Tire 

More car manufacturers are getting rid of the classic spare tire because it reduces weight and improves fuel economy. So don’t worry about whether or not the car you’re interested in comes with one. You really don’t need it. Today’s vehicles have tire pressure monitoring systems that let you know when your tire is low on air and needs to be fixed or replaced. If your tire blows out, you’ll need to call for a tow. 

Gesture Control Audio 

In theory, an infotainment system that works with your hand gestures sounds great. But you can probably do without this added expense. Right now, these systems aren’t that accurate at detecting hand gestures, which means they could misinterpret your signals and crank up the music when you want it lower. For now, stick with the reliable choice – the press of a button. 

In-Car Voice Control

Surprisingly, voice activated in-car systems have been around for nearly two decades. And they have gotten increasingly better over the years. However, they’re far from perfect and often misinterpret what was said. And, these voice control systems can’t do everything, so it’s possible that what you ask for will be a functional dead end.

Third Row Seats in Compact Cars 

Having a third row is highly desirable for large families, but don’t be automatically swayed by a compact crossover with third-row seating. These seats are so small and compact, usually only small children can fit in them. Even then, you’ll probably have to shift the second row forward, compromising their comfort. If you need three rows, we recommend going for a larger SUV. 

Shopping for a new vehicle? Check out the inventory from RepoFinder. We have a great selection of repossessed cars, trucks, SUVs and recreational vehicles at low prices. Many are close to new, in good condition and packed with added features you’ll find useful.