Category Archives: Repo Cars

buying repo from a bank

Why You Should Buy Repo Cars Directly from a Lender

When buying repossessed vehicles, you have a number of ways to purchase them, such as from a lender auction, used car dealer or reseller service. However, the best way to buy repo cars is directly from a bank or credit union. Lenders just want to recoup their losses, so they’re willing to work with buyers and give them a great deal. 

Below are a few reasons why it’s best to purchase repossessions from a bank or credit union

Banks are Motivated Sellers 

A car owner only needs to miss a few payments before their car is repossessed. Lenders rely on interest to make profits, so a car payment that isn’t being made is an immediate loss. If the bank can’t work with the owner to get paid, they will repossess the vehicle and recoup their losses. 

With this in mind, banks are very motivated sellers. Some will allow you to look at their repo file, which lists repo cars, trucks, ATVs, RVs and more. The lists are free, unlike resellers that often charge for this service. Also, the lender will not clean up the vehicle as the dealerships do, so you can keep your price tag to a minimum.

Financing is Easier (and Cheaper!) 

Another perk to buying a repossessed car or truck from a lender is that you can get quick financing, especially if you already have a relationship with the bank. Remember, the banks aren’t looking to make a profit. They just want to recoup their loss and move on. Banks make money by lending money, and this puts you in a great position. 

For example, banks often incentivize repo sales with longer loan terms and reduced interest rates. Additionally, there are no commissions or fees when buying directly from the bank. The transaction takes place between you and the bank – no middleman. 

The Selection is Higher Quality 

Trashed repossessions typically go straight to auction. The banks won’t waste their time with them. This means that the lender’s list of repos should be decent. In fact, it’s not uncommon to find nearly new repossessions on the list. Sometimes, brand-new car owners can’t afford their payments, and their shiny new car gets repossessed. 

Also, repossessions are not limited to cars and trucks only. You can also find a great selection of boats, airplanes, yachts, ATVs, RVs, farm equipment, airplanes and even homes! 

Are you ready to buy a repossession from a local bank or credit union? There’s no need to spend hours on the internet looking for repo lists. RepoFinder.com offers a directory of banks selling repossessions in all 50 states. The service is completely free for you to use – no fees, no commissions and no transaction costs. Check us out today and find a repossession that fits your needs and budget. 

repossessed vehicle great value

5 Ways to Tell You’re Getting a Good Repo

Buying a repossession is a lot like buying a used car, except it is an “as-is” purchase. There is no warranty from the dealer, so you absorb whatever problems the car has. This is why repos are hundreds to thousands of dollars less than other vehicles. 

Even though there are significant cost savings upfront, you don’t want to end up wasting your money. So, how can you determine that the repossession you’re looking at is actually a good deal? Below are five signs to look for.

  1. You’re buying a repo from a bank or credit union.

Where you buy your repo from makes a big difference. We recommend working with lenders because they have the best prices with no added fees or commissions. Plus, you can often get attractive financing offers directly from the bank. Lenders are also transparent with pricing and bidding. 

  1. You can do an inspection. 

You should always ask to see the repo before you make an offer. Again, when you work with a reputable seller, an inspection shouldn’t be a problem. If you don’t know a lot about cars, bring along someone who does. They can look over the repo and make sure it’s a good value. 

  1. The repo has a title. 

You should never buy a vehicle without the title. If a repo doesn’t have a title, there’s no telling who really owns the car. You could pay for it, and the owner could claim ownership later on. What you don’t get with a repossession is a warranty from the dealer. But, a repossession does not change the title or manufacturer warranty. 

  1. You know where it came from.

It’s not always possible to know where a repossession came from. However, if the bank can tell you some information about the vehicle, it’s in your favor. Depending on the circumstances, the lender may know the condition of the repo, a little bit about the history and the area it came from. This information, coupled with an inspection, can give you greater peace of mind. 

  1. You feel good about the purchase. 

If you feel that you’ve found the right repo car, make an offer! Don’t be afraid to negotiate or offer a lower price, especially if you want financing from the bank. On the other hand, if you don’t feel confident, you should wait. There are tons of repossessions, with new ones being listed daily. There is no reason to buy something you’re unsure of. 

It is possible to find a clean repossession in good working condition at a great value. For a convenient list of banks and credit unions with repo lists in your area, visit RepoFinder.com today.