Tag Archives: repos

teen driver

New Teen Driver in the House? Get Them a Bank Owned Vehicle!

If you have a teenager in the home and they want a car, you have a few options to consider. You can buy the car for them, let them pay for the car on their own or do a combination of both. While it may seem tempting to go out and buy your teen a new car, especially if you have the money, it may not be the best option. 

Something else to consider is buying your teen a bank owned car. These vehicles have been repossessed from their previous owners and are now owned by the banks. However, the banks are in the market to lend money – not sell vehicles. What does this mean for you? You can get a decent first car for a fraction of what you’d pay at the dealership. 

Let’s look at the benefits of buying your teen a repossessed car. 

Honest, Affordable Prices 

Car dealerships drive people in with attractive ads, but they’re often deceptive. They might tease low payments, when in reality, the payments are temporary. Or they might show prices after a large down payment or low rates that only go up to a certain amount. Whatever the case, once you get to the dealership, the prices will be more than you thought.

Bank owned vehicles are affordable for a couple of reasons. First, the banks are highly motivated sellers that want to recoup some of their losses. Second, these cars are sold as-is. Whatever problems they come with are your responsibility. In return, the banks offer steep discounts to make these vehicles attractive. 

Low Monthly Payments 

When you pay less for a vehicle, the monthly loan payments will be lower as well. If your family can’t afford another car payment right now, a repo is a great option because you’ll pay far less than if you were to shop at the dealership. In fact, many repos are cheap enough that you can buy them outright without an auto loan. This is a great option for teens that have a nest egg saved up. 

Already Used and Loved 

Repossessions are previously owned so they’ve already been driven, used and loved. Even though your teen may feel that something new and shiny is best, this is rarely the case from a practical standpoint. Kids are kids and first-time cars often take a beating. 

The nice thing about used cars is that they’ve already been loved. You don’t have to worry too much about dents and dings. And your teen won’t have the pressure of keeping the car in pristine condition – they can focus on their driving experience instead. 

Find Your Teen Driver a Car at RepoFinder

RepoFinder has a huge database of repossessed cars that are perfect for new drivers. You can use our search tools to find a car that offers the features your child needs to be safe on the road while saving money and keeping payments low. Shop with us today and see what you can find for your teen driver! 

two people in vehicle

People are Attached to their Cars. Banks Aren’t. Negotiate a Great Deal on a Bank-owned Car.

This entry was posted in Repo Cars and tagged , , , on by .

Some people have an emotional attachment to their cars. They give them a name, gender and even a personality. Even though it may sound silly to have a personal relationship with a vehicle, it’s not uncommon. According to one study, 70 percent of respondents admitted to feeling “very attached” or “somewhat attached” to their cars. 

There are a number of reasons why people get attached to their vehicles. For example, people often go through major milestones with them – weddings, road trips, new babies. Some view their vehicle as a financial investment, while others have had them passed down. Because of this emotional attachment, 36 percent of people say they want their car to go to a good home. 

Don’t Want to Deal with a Sentimental Owner? Buy a Repo! 

While there’s nothing wrong with having an emotional attachment to your vehicle, things are harder if you’re on the other side. If you’re looking to buy a vehicle that someone is attached to, they may want to charge more because of this emotional investment. They may also be insulted if you try to negotiate. 

The good news is that you can purchase a used vehicle at a great price without having to deal with a sentimental owner. Bank-owned vehicles are in possession of banks and lenders – they were taken from owners who could no longer afford them. 

And trust us, the banks have no emotional attachment to these vehicles. They make money off lending money, not keeping cars. This gives you the upper hand – you can negotiate a better deal and get a more fair, unbiased breakdown of the vehicle’s condition. 

Tips for Negotiating with the Banks 

Buying a bank-owned vehicle is a great option if you’re looking for a fast and easy car sale. Here are some tips for negotiating a great deal on a repo. 

  • Knowledge is power. Know everything you can about the vehicle so that you can negotiate fairly. 
  • Think about financing early. Having pre-approved financing makes you a stronger candidate. The bank will be more willing to close the deal.
  • Read the paperwork. Make sure that the seller isn’t slipping in any additional fees or add-ons.
  • Be patient. If you need to walk away from the deal, that’s ok. Even though there are a lot of bank-owned vehicles, buying one of these cars is a process that requires patience. 

RepoFinder.com has a full list of bank-owned vehicles like cars, trucks, boats, ATVs, motorcycles and more. When you visit our site, click on your state and find the repos available in your area. It’s free, so find an affordable bank-owned car today! 

line of cars

Pros and Cons to Buying Bank Owned Vehicles

A bank-owned car can be a great deal – or a total nightmare. As with other purchases, it’s important to do your research and be a smart shopper. When you’re careful about your purchase, you can take home a safe, reliable car for a fraction of the cost. And, banks have more than just cars. Many people turn to bank-owned inventory when buying pickup trucks, boats, ATVs, RVs and small aircraft. 

Below you’ll find the pros and cons to buying bank-owned vehicles, and then you can decide if this route is right for you. 

Pros of Buying Repossessed Vehicles 

When the owner of a vehicle doesn’t make their loan payments, their vehicle can be taken away by the bank. Usually this happens after a few months of defaulted payments, but it can happen even sooner than that. Some people assume that repos are always old, beat up cars that no one wants, but it’s often the new cars that people can’t afford. 

Here are the pros to buying bank-owned vehicles: 

  • Get a great deal on a decent vehicle. Banks and lenders want a quick sale to reduce their loan loss, which is why they price their inventory low and are willing to negotiate. 
  • Shop a wide selection. Cars and trucks are taken away all the time from their owners. Banks end up selling them to dealerships, the general public or auction sites, leaving you to shop an impressive selection of cars, trucks, SUVs and more. 
  • Fast turnaround. While you do need to be patient when shopping for repos, the process usually moves quickly when you find something you like. Banks and lenders want these vehicles off their lots as soon as possible. 

Cons of Buying Bank-Owned Cars 

There are some disadvantages to buying repossessed vehicles, which is why they aren’t for everyone. Here are some cons to be aware of. 

  • Lack of test drives. It’s possible that you won’t be able to test drive the car before you buy it. This can be a problem if there are hidden issues. To offset this risk, be sure to look at the vehicle’s pictures, get a condition report and schedule an inspection. 
  • As-is purchase. If you buy a repo and decide you don’t like it, you can’t bring it back. You’re stuck with it because all repos are “as-is” purchases. That said, some vehicles still carry their original warranty, which is passed down to the new owner. 
  • Unclear background. Banks usually send out a third-party to repo vehicles, so you probably won’t know a lot about its background. The good news is that you can find most of this information online, as auction centers must disclose this information to the buyers. 

As you can see, there are clear pros and cons to buying bank-owned cars, trucks and RVs. RepoFinder.com has a vast selection of vehicles that are in good condition and have low mileage. Take a look and see what types of vehicles you can find in your price range – it’s free! 

wheels

AWD vs 4WD: What’s the Difference?

When shopping for used cars, there are a number of features to pay attention to. An important one is all-wheel drive (AWD) and four-wheel drive (4WD). Years ago, if you wanted four driven wheels, you were limited to a small selection of vehicles. Today, this is not the case. Close to half of all vehicles sold in the U.S. have either AWD or 4WD. 

So what’s the significance of having all-wheel drive or four-wheel drive? Is one better than the other? We’ll answer your questions in this article. 

What is All-Wheel Drive? 

All-wheel drive systems send power to both the front and rear wheels. Some AWD vehicles have all four wheels driving continuously, while others operate in mostly two-wheel drive. If you need the extra traction, the car will automatically send power to all four wheels. 

The benefit to AWD is that you don’t have to make any decisions about your wheels. Either the wheels are driven the whole time, or the system will drive with two and send power to all four if it senses a loss of traction. This allows you to drive smoothly in all types of weather conditions and terrains. 

What is Four-Wheel Drive? 

Four-wheel drive systems have become incredibly sophisticated over the years. They can handle more off-road use and are found in a wide range of vehicles, including luxury cars. However, 4WD is robust and remains most popular for ruggedness and pulling power. 

Like AWD, 4WD comes in two types: full-time and part-time. With full-time 4WD, the wheels receive power continuously. With part-time 4WD, only the two wheels move. If you need to send power to the other wheels, you’ll need to make the decision and push a button or shift the lever. 

Which is Better: AWD vs. 4WD? 

There is no best option for everyone. It all depends on where you live and what types of driving conditions you encounter. Before buying a repossession in your area, think about how you plan to use the vehicle. Will you be going off-roading with your new truck? Do you drive in snow and ice in the winter? Is fuel economy important to you?

We recommend AWD for many drivers because it delivers traction in the right conditions, offers better fuel economy and can be found in a wide range of vehicles, including luxury cars and SUVs. On the other hand, if you live in a remote area, work in extreme conditions or enjoy off-roading, we suggest 4WD. It’s better equipped to handle these rugged conditions. 

Find Your AWD or 4WD Repo Today 

When you shop for repossessed cars and trucks with RepoFinder, we try to put AWD or 4WD in the vehicle’s description. This way, you can easily see what system each vehicle comes with. It’s a quick and easy way to narrow down your options, especially if you prefer one system over the other. View a full list of repos in your area by visiting RepoFinder.com today. 

person driving vehicle

What Steps Should I Follow When Buying a Repossessed Vehicle?

If you’re shopping for an affordable vehicle in decent condition, you don’t have to settle for a pricey used car. Another option is a repossessed vehicle, or one that was taken away from its previous owner for defaulting on the loan. 

The nice thing about shopping for repos is that they don’t have any upcharges. Buying a used car from a dealership is still expensive because it has been cleaned, repaired and inspected by a mechanic. Repo cars are sold as-is, which is reflected in the price. 

Below are the steps you should follow when buying a repossessed car, truck or other vehicle. 

Choose who you are going to buy from.

There are a number of ways you can purchase a repossessed vehicle:

  • Lenders. Buying directly from a lender is the best way to get a great deal. Credit unions and banks want to get rid of repos and recoup their losses, passing on the savings to you. For a complete list of repos in your state, visit RepoFinder.com.
  • Repo reseller. The benefit to working with a repo reseller is that they generally have some standard for the condition of vehicles they sell. You will pay more for these vehicles, but you can expect a better car. 
  • Auctions. There are all types of auctions online, though the majority are for used car dealers, not individual buyers. However, if you happen to find an online auction, make sure you register online and take a look at their inventory. 
  • Used car dealers. Used car dealerships do sell repos, but keep in mind that they will be more expensive. This is because the dealerships inspect the vehicles and fix them up before selling. 

Determine your budget. 

It’s important to establish your budget in advance. Most repos need some type of maintenance, so this will need to be factored into your budget. If you use all of your money to buy the car, you won’t have enough to make essential repairs. Like used cars, repos come in all price ranges. 

Research the vehicles you want. 

To narrow down your search online, research the best vehicles for your needs. Consider what features are most important to you, such as special cameras, sensors, tire pressure alerts and seating. Also research what car makes/models are most reliable. Generally speaking, repo shoppers do best with reliable, low maintenance cars that hold their value. 

Place your bid.

Once you find a repo that fits your criteria, you can make an offer on it. We also recommend having financing in place, as this shows that you are a serious buyer. 

Nearly all repo sites require you to be a member, which is why it’s important to choose how you’re going to buy your vehicle first. For example, when you sign up for RepoFinder Pro for just $4.95 a month, you get full access to our repo list and can place bids. 

Inspect the vehicle.

If the seller accepts your bid, you can purchase the vehicle. We strongly recommend inspecting the repo before signing anything. You probably won’t be able to test drive it, but you can look at it for an overall assessment. Once this is done, you can sign the paperwork and take your vehicle home! 

Buying a repo is fairly straightforward, though it does require more diligence on the buyer’s part. You won’t have a car salesperson showing you around and selling you vehicles, which some look at as an advantage, but you will be on your own. Use the online tools to your advantage, research the cars you’re interested in and inspect the repo before signing anything and you should be just fine.

driving a repo car from a credit union

Is it Smart to Buy a Repo from a Credit Union?

If you’re thinking about buying a repossessed car, truck or recreational vehicle, you’ll find a number of ways to make this purchase. However, not all are created equal. For example, if you buy a repo from a dealership, you are going to pay more because the dealership has taken some time to fix and clean the vehicle. For the best prices and freedom in negotiations, it’s smart to buy a repo from a credit union.

What is a Credit Union? 

A credit union is a financial cooperative that is owned by its members. It exists to serve its members, allowing them a safe place to save and borrow money at affordable rates. Like banks, credit unions also accept deposits and make loans. They also repossess things when their borrowers don’t pay. 

Compared to banks, credit unions don’t have various departments and teams to manage repossessions. This means that in a short amount of time, they can start looking like used car lots. The solution to this problem is to get rid of repossessions as quickly as possible. It’s a win for the credit unions because they get vehicles off their lots, and it’s a win for buyers because they have safe vehicles to choose from. 

What are the Benefits of Buying from a Credit Union? 

Because credit unions are operated independently, there are different procedures that they follow. So, before buying a vehicle from a credit union in your area, ask about their process for listing repossessions. Gathering all the information you can will increase your chances of finding a safe and reliable repo car. 

Here are some benefits to purchasing a repo from a local credit union: 

  • Competitive prices. Credit unions want to get the cars off their lots and recoup their losses. You can find lower-than-average rates on plenty of great cars by browsing lender inventories. 
  • Ability to negotiate. Most of the time, credit unions are open to negotiations. Be sure to do your research so that you can make a compelling offer that’s hard to refuse! 
  • Option for financing. It’s possible that you can get financing directly from the credit union. Typically, credit unions have lower interest rates and fees, too.  
  • Inspect the vehicle. As long as you limit your search to local credit unions, you should be able to inspect the vehicle on their lot. If you find a vehicle in another state, you can have it shipped to you. 

Bottom line: Buying a repossession from a credit union is a great option, especially when you’re shopping for a vehicle on a budget. To browse a full list of repossessions in your area from local banks and credit unions, visit RepoFinder.com. It’s free! 

man looking at vin in car

Buying a Repo: What Does a VIN Lookup Tell You?

If you’re interested in buying a repo car or truck, you can learn a lot of information from the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number). A VIN is a unique code given to every vehicle when it’s manufactured. It contains 17 letters and numbers that can be found on the vehicle’s dashboard on the driver’s side. The numbers may seem random, but each section gives information on the vehicle’s origin.

Here at RepoFinder, we always remind car shoppers to inspect the vehicles they plan on purchasing. There are many great repos out there, but you have to do your research! The VIN is a good place to start. You can use this free tool from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to check if the car is subject to a recall. 

Breaking Down a VIN 

VIN information is organized into groups. By looking at each section, you can get a lot of information on a vehicle. For detailed charts breaking down the meaning of each digit and letter, visit driving-tests.org

  • First letter or digit. The first letter identifies the country of origin. For example, cars made in the U.S. start with a 1, 4 or 5, whereas cars made in Canada begin with a 2. Letters may also be used to indicate a country, as is the case with England (“S”), Germany (“W”) and South Korea (“K”). 
  • Second letter. The next letter tells you about the manufacturer. In some cases, the letter stands for the manufacturer’s name – “A” for Audi, “B” for BMW and “G” for General Motors. However, this isn’t always consistent because the letter “A” can also refer to Jaguar or Mitsubishi. 
  • Third digit. The third number, when combined with the first two letters and numbers, tells you the vehicle’s type. 
  • Numbers 4-9. The next set of numbers describes the vehicle’s model, body type, restraint system, transmission type and engine code. 
  • Number 9. This number is the check digit, which is used to detect invalid VINs. 
  • Numbers 10-17. The next group of numbers indicates the vehicle identifier section. For example, Number 10 is the model year, Number 11 is the manufacturing plant and the last six numbers are the production sequence numbers. 

VIN Checks are Free

Now that you have the basics on what a VIN stands for, you can get to work checking the VINs of the repos you’re looking at. You can run a VIN check for free, but this will only provide you with basic information on the car. We still recommend talking to the bank or credit union that has possession of the vehicle and doing a thorough inspection. For a full list of bank repos in your area, visit RepoFinder.com

RV sitting on campground

Can You Really Save Thousands on a Bank Repo RV?

Are you drawn to RV living? You certainly aren’t alone. The RV industry has seen tremendous growth over the years because it’s an affordable way to see the country. Plus, if you’re handy, you can purchase an inexpensive bank repo RV and transform it into a classy and cozy home for you and your family. 

So, can you really save thousands by choosing a bank repo RV? The short answer – yes. In order to save as much money as possible, it’s important to know what to look for. Below are some tips for saving thousands of dollars on your next RV purchase. 

Lenders Have the Lowest Prices  

Start with lenders and find out how they manage their repossessions. This is better than searching online for repo RVs, as you’re more likely to come across dealerships selling them than lenders and credit unions. While there’s nothing wrong with buying a previous repo from a dealership, you will pay a lot more for it. For the best deals, stick to lenders, banks and credit unions in your area. Find a full list on RepoFinder.com

Negotiate with the Banks 

Banks and lenders will try to get what they can for repossessions, so they may be willing to go below the listing price. The only way you’ll know is by asking. Sometimes, the listing will say, “Prices negotiable. All reasonable offers considered.” Other times, it won’t be as clear. You don’t want a low-ball offer to prevent you from getting the RV, so arm yourself with solid information, make a compelling offer and have a counteroffer. 

Choose RVs with Good Resale Value 

Now, this is a bit of a personal suggestion. If you don’t mind these smells, you may not mind taking on an RV that has them. However, RVs that have strong pet or cigarette odors were probably used for long-term living, and it may be difficult to get the smell out. Plus, if you choose to sell the RV in the future, you may have a hard time doing so. Air out the RV for a few minutes during the inspection to see if it helps the problem. 

Always Inspect the RV Before Buying 

As with any repo purchase, we always recommend that buyers inspect the vehicle. On an RV, you should inspect the brakes, engine and radiator, as well as look for signs of leaks. As you know, there is more to RVs than the vehicle side. You’ll also need to inspect the toilets, showers, windows, awning, lighting, power ports and so on. Here’s a great article to refer to. 

For a full list of bank repo RVs in your state, visit RepoFinder.com.

cars in a flood

How to Look for Flood Damage in a Used Vehicle

This entry was posted in Repo Cars and tagged , , , on by .

Every year, thousands of vehicles are damaged in floods. Some of them are expected to be sold on the used car market, putting consumers at risk. Floodwater damage can lead to safety risks because parts in the engine, transmission and drive train become damaged. This means that they won’t work properly, making cars unreliable and unsafe on the road. 

Fortunately, there are ways to look for flood damage in a repossession or used vehicle. Below we’ll teach you how to spot the signs of floodwater damage and how to keep you and your passengers safe. 

Ask about the Vehicle’s History

The first thing you can do is ask about the history of the vehicle. A dealer can verify that there is no damage, as they must report the car’s condition back to the consumer accurately. However, in the case of repossessions, there may be no way to tell where the vehicle came from. Lenders and banks often have no history on repossessions, which means you’ll have to do some more investigating. 

Check the VIN 

Always check the VIN before buying a used car. There are a number of sites you can use, such as the National Insurance Crime Bureau’s VinCheck or Experian’s Auto Check. These reports provide a detailed history report. You can find out if flood damage was reported or the vehicle was given a salvage title. Additionally, pay attention to where the vehicle was from. Were there recent hurricanes or storms in the area? 

Inspect the Interior 

The next step is to check the interior of the vehicle. Responsible sellers will allow you to do this before placing a bid on the repo. Here is what we recommend paying attention to: 

  • Damp, musty odors 
  • Dirt buildup in unusual places
  • Sludge or debris in unusual places
  • Excessive use of deodorizers
  • Unusual aesthetic upgrades, like brand new interior fabric 
  • Rusted or corroded electrical wiring 

Look at the Exterior 

It’s normal for repossessions to have some exterior damage, especially as many sit outside for extended periods of time. But, there are a few things to pay attention to. First, look for moisture beads or fog in the light fixtures. This is hard to remove, so a car with water damage will often have foggy lights. 

Second, check for signs of rust. Corrosion is not common in vehicles that are new or owned in warmer climates. Lastly, there are rubber drain plugs located under the vehicle and doors. If they look like they were messed with, it’s possible they were used to drain water. 

Conclusion 

Make sure to always bring a trusted expert with you when inspecting the repo. There are many great cars out there, and you want to be sure that you walk away with one. To browse repossessions in your area, visit RepoFinder.com today. 

college student

5 Reasons Why Repo Cars are Great for College Students

Do you have a college student who’s begging to have a car? With the increasing costs of college tuition and everything that comes with it, it’s no wonder why buying a vehicle is the last thing you want to do. But, there are practical reasons why some college students need a vehicle, such as getting to and from work or sports practice. 

Fortunately, there is a solution to your dilemma: a repossessed vehicle. These used cars are a great pick for college students and other young drivers. Here are five reasons why. 

  1. Repos are reasonably priced. 

Repossessions have been taken away by the lender or bank. They want to recoup their losses as quickly as possible, which allows you to land a great deal on a used car. Use RepoFinder.com to find repossessions in your area. We recommend buying directly from the lender – not a dealership or third party. Buying direct is cheapest, and you may even be able to purchase the vehicle without financing. 

  1. You won’t mind leaving it parked on campus. 

If your student comes to college with a car, they won’t get a heated, covered parking space. The vehicle will be left out in various parking lots or on the sides of streets. It may be borrowed or used to transport friends. Repos are not always in poor condition, but many of them have been well-loved. You won’t mind if it gets a few dings along the way. 

  1. …Or they sit in your driveway.

Perhaps you want to purchase a used vehicle for your student to use when they come home. If the car will be sitting on your driveway while your child is away at college, a repossession is a great option. Again, the used car will probably already have some dents and dings, so it can sit outside without you worrying. When your child does come home from college, they’ll have a safe car to drive.

  1. Your insurance rates will be lower. 

Car insurance rates are typically lower with repossessions. Because these cars aren’t new, they are cheaper to insure. And, if you choose to buy the vehicle without financing, you don’t have to get full coverage. You can get the basic insurance in your state and save money on your monthly premiums. 

  1. They’re not beaters. 

Lastly, repossessed vehicles are not beaters. In fact, many are new and in great condition! This means that your college student can have a car that they’re proud of and start working toward more responsibility by making monthly payments, paying for oil changes, etc. It’s a win-win for everyone in the household.

To browse repossessions in your area, visit RepoFinder.com. It’s free and updated regularly, so check back often for new repos that you can bid on.